Opening times

  • Monday Closed
  • Tuesday Closed
  • Wednesday 10am-4pm
  • Thursday 10am-4pm
  • Friday 10am-4pm
  • Saturday 10am-4pm
  • Sunday 10am-4pm
More information

Opening times

  • Monday Closed
  • Tuesday Closed
  • Wednesday 10am - 4pm
  • Thursday 10am - 4pm
  • Friday 10am - 4pm
  • Saturday 10am - 4pm
  • Sunday 10am - 4pm
More information

Opening times

  • Monday Closed
  • Tuesday Closed
  • Wednesday 10am - 4pm
  • Thursday 10am - 4pm
  • Friday 10am - 4pm
  • Saturday 10am - 4pm
  • Sunday 10am - 4pm
More information

Opening times

  • Monday 9.30am - 5pm
  • Tuesday 9.30am - 5pm
  • Wednesday 9.30am - 5pm
  • Thursday 9.30am - 5pm
  • Friday 9.30am - 5pm
  • Saturday 9.30am - 5pm
  • Sunday Closed
More information
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About Museums Northumberland bait

The ten-year mission of Museums Northumberland bait was developed from consultation with over 500 people in 2012. The programme was also inspired by the story of the Pitmen Painters, who learned about art by making art. The Pitman Painters collection is on permanent public display at Woodhorn Museum.  

Ten-year mission 

“To create a long-term increase in levels of arts engagement, driven by the creativity and ambition of people living in South East Northumberland, having a demonstrable effect on the well-being of local people and levels of social energy and activism within communities and the means to sustain those changes in the future.” 

There are broadly four parts to this mission and over ten years we gathered strong evidence of progress: 

  • More people taking part 
  • More people making decisions 
  • Positive impact on wellbeing 
  • Legacy of skills and independent projects 

More people taking part

From April 2013 to March 2023 there were 140,000 ‘in person’ engagements and over 200,000 ‘digital engagements.’ 79% of people who took part, live in South East Northumberland.

From 2014 to 2022 we collected postcodes of people taking part. These postcodes were analysed each year by The Audience Agency, using Audience Spectrum and Mosaic profiling. Over eight years this demonstrated that 60% of people were from traditionally low engagement groups, 32% from medium engagement groups and 8% from high engagement groups.  

More people making decisions

Over 900 people were deeply involved in shaping the programme through commissioning and programming panels and by collaborating with artists to make decisions within projects. In most cases, this involved 100+ hours of involvement for each person and people shared why this was important: “We’re involved, we get a say in what happens. Normally you get told what to do but we had meetings to decide what we wanted to do.” 

Positive impact on wellbeing

Over ten years we used the Warwick and Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS) to measure the impact on community wellbeing. Analysis every year consistently showed between 72% and 76% of people taking part reporting an increase in sense of wellbeing. This data was complemented by qualitative feedback, and this is just one example: “I didn’t go out of the house before, but I like art, so I came along to see what it was all about. Best thing I’ve ever done.” 

Legacy of skills and independent projects

As a result of taking part, people described gaining confidence and a wide range of transferable skills, including creative, planning, project management, communications, technical, networking and fundraising skills. 15 groups and organisations in the area went on to become arts commissioners and £182,000 was secured by partners to run their own projects.