Opening times

  • Monday Closed
  • Tuesday Closed
  • Wednesday 10am-4pm
  • Thursday 10am-4pm
  • Friday 10am-4pm
  • Saturday 10am-4pm
  • Sunday 10am-4pm
More information

Opening times

  • Monday Closed
  • Tuesday Closed
  • Wednesday 10am-4pm
  • Thursday 10am-4pm
  • Friday 10am-4pm
  • Saturday 10am-4pm
  • Sunday 10am-4pm
More information

Opening times

  • Monday 9.30am-5pm
  • Tuesday 9.30am-5pm
  • Wednesday 9.30am-5pm
  • Thursday 9.30am-5pm
  • Friday 9.30am-5pm
  • Saturday 9.30am-5pm
  • Sunday Closed
More information

Opening times

  • Monday Closed
  • Tuesday Closed
  • Wednesday 10am - 4pm
  • Thursday 10am - 4pm
  • Friday 10am - 4pm
  • Saturday 10am - 4pm
  • Sunday 10am - 4pm
More information
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The Coal Queen

£1,050.00

Out of stock

Museums Northumberland presents ‘Northumberland Folk’, a series of four new exhibitions by illustrator Jonny Hannah with most of the artworks in the exhibitions for sale.

The exhibition runs until the 31st of October and we will be in touch about when you will be able to collect your purchase (shipping is not included in the price but we can provide courier contacts for you to arrange independently). We will be able to give you more detail of exact dates nearer the time but collection dates will likely be before December 2021.

See our FAQs for further information.

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  • Painted cut out
  • Dimensions (approx.) 91x153x1.5cm
  • Image of work in the Northumberland Folk Exhibition at Woodhorn Museum 19.05.2021 to 31.10.2021

Traditionally, every miner’s picnic; an annual day of fun & games for the hard working pitmen & their families, was accompanied by a local bonny lass in her best frock, being crowned the Coal Queen.

This tradition in Northumberland ended in 1983. But I began to think how the Coal Queen could be reimagined. Maybe, she was the female counterpart of another folk hero, the Green Man? He represents the coming of spring & growth, so perhaps the Coal Queen could embody the darker months, bringing as it says; ‘light, warmth & togetherness’…

All hail the Coal Queen, for although the pits have gone, the need to huddle around a source of heat will always be there, whether it be a log burner, a radiator, or a well earned cup of tea.

And let’s face it, in a historical sense, she was involved in all three…